The impact of a job you hate on your mental health

Escape the ‘Hate Your Job’ Blues - Uncover the Secret to Reclaiming Your Energy and Happiness!

Ever wondered why you feel drained, unhappy and just not yourself? 

Do you realize the impact of a job you hate on your mental health?

Do the Numbers

Using a calculatorDo the numbers. They never lie. You will be surprised by the results.

I want you to calculate how many hours a year you are working. 

Here is a guide:

There are 365 x 24 = 8,760 hours in a year.

As a guide if you work the normal 8-hour day 5 days a week. Total 40 hours a week, and you work an average of 45 weeks a year. Therefore, you work 45 weeks X 40 hours a week = 1800 hours a year.

Say you sleep the mandatory 8 hours a night.

That’s 365 x 8 = 2,920 hours a year asleep.

So the waking hours every year are about -     

8,760 (total hours a year)-2,920 (hours asleep) = 5840 waking hours a year.

If you work 1800 hours a year, then as a percentage of total waking hours is 30%.

Here is the calculation 1800 x 100 / 5840 = 30.82119. Let’s not get too precise and call it 30% of your waking hours at work.

So 70% of your waking hours are for you to do what you want. Enjoy the outdoors, eat, drink, play, enjoy friends and family. Whatever you need to do to be alive and happy.

So what the hell is going on?

You spend a substantial part of your life working (30%). Working in a job that you hate. 

This is a significant source of daily stress and anxiety, sapping 70% of your drive and happiness. This amount of time, as I’ve illustrated above can make you miserable at best. Create mental health issues at worse. All created by the 30% of misery as a result of working at a job you hate. Doesn't make sense.

sitting up in bedIsn’t it time to sit up, think about what you are doing and damn well do something about it?

Isn’t it time to sit up, think about what you are doing and damn well do something about it?

The impact of a job you hate on your mental health can anchor you in a perpetual state of discontentment and frustration, dragging your mental health downhill.

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Feeling trapped in a job you hate can lead to a toxic situation

It’s like placing your mental health inside a pressure cooker, waiting for it to explode. And it’s not just about job dissatisfaction. It’s about how it’s robbing you of your happiness, peace, and self-worth.

fat manHere’s an observation. If you notice an excessively overweight person, it’s a 53% chance they hate their job.

Feeling unsatisfied or unfulfilled within your job can lead to symptoms of depression. This can be manifested as a loss of energy, constant tiredness, difficulty concentrating, negative thoughts, and irritability. What about weight gain? This is endemic. Just look around you. 

Here’s an observation. If you notice an excessively overweight person, it’s a 53% chance they hate their job.

cemetryRemember, you're dead a long, long time. So is it worth 30% of your waking hours putting up with crap?

You may want to change, but the fear of the unknown and the fear of failure can lead to procrastination. 

Sound familiar?

Just a reality check right here - you are dead a long, long time. So is it worth thirty percent of your waking hours putting up with crap?

You might even notice physical symptoms, such as headaches, stomach problems or difficulty sleeping, all resulting from the stress of being in a job you hate. This is your body’s way of telling you something needs to change. It would be a good idea to get medical advice. Maybe if the budget stretches, it would be a great thing to sit down with a ‘shrink’.

The impact of a job you hate on your mental health can lead to damaging behaviors, such as excessive eating, drinking, or even drug use as a means to cope.

drunk at a barThe impact of a job you hate on your mental health can lead to damaging behaviors like excessive drinking, or even drug use as a means to cope.

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The impact of a job you hate on your mental health and other serious health issues.

This cycle of stress and coping can lead to serious health problems, including heart disease and diabetes.

Are you getting it?

angry man raging at womanBeing in a job you hate can affect your personal life. It strains your relationships and creates chaos in your family life.

Being in a job that brings you no pleasure or contentment can affect your personal life. It strains your relationships, creates chaos in your family, and elevates your feelings of self-doubt and self-worth. Ugly stuff. I hate writing this negative shit. I do. I know first-hand what it’s like.

I want to give you some positive things from here on

Happy woman at computerAnd now for the positive stuff. Because everything is fixable.

The question has to be put - “Why remain stuck in a job you hate at the cost of your mental health?”

Perhaps it’s a lack of confidence - fixable.

A fear of change - fixable

The dread of economic instability - fixable. 

Whatever it is, there are solutions.  

Woman writing in a notebookIf you have read my content on this website I am a massive advocate of the trusty notebook. So, get out the notebook, find a quiet place and start writing.

The first strategy is to recognize and acknowledge your feelings. Take some time, observe your mood, and listen to your body. Listen to what it’s saying and do not ignore it!

You know if you have read my content on this website I am a massive advocate of the trusty notebook. So, get out the notebook, find a quiet place and start writing. Do not type into the laptop write it all in longhand.

The second step is to assess and identify what aspects of your job affect your happiness and mental health. Is it your boss? The workload? The company culture? Identifying the source of your dissatisfaction is the key to making positive change. Do a score on each element out of ten. Work on the high score first, then work your way down.

The third step is action! 

This step is a powerful antidote to the issues. Draw up a plan - whether it’s looking for a new job, upskilling, or even starting your own business. Give it life. It doesn’t have to be done all at once. It is flexible. Change it or tweak it when you think it needs it. 

If you decide to start your own business, don’t let fear stop you. The fear of failure is natural, and it shouldn’t hinder you from taking a step towards your happiness. 

Failures are great. Consider yourself on the right track when you fail. You are out there having a go. It is a learning curve.

A woman standing on a pathYou are on the right track even when you fail. Take small, consistent steps. Don’t rush. Sometimes, the only change you need is a shift in perception and attitude.

Remember, take small, consistent steps. Don’t rush. Sometimes, the only change you need is a shift in perception and attitude.

Experiment at work to create a sound work-life balance. Do this by setting boundaries, prioritizing time with family and friends, and engaging in activities you enjoy.

Building a strong support network can have a significant positive impact on your mental health. 

Surround yourself with people who inspire, uplift, and understand your situation. Get yourself a mentor/coach/teacher.

It’s also important to seek professional help if needed. Therapists and career counsellors can provide valuable insights and tools to manage the stress and anxiety of hating your job.

Health and wellness activities can aid in maintaining your mental health. Regular exercise, healthy eating, and adequate sleep can do wonders for your mood and energy levels. Create a morning routine.

Consider mindfulness techniques, such as meditation or deep breathing exercises, to help reduce work-related stress and increase your overall well-being.

sad womanThere’s no point lingering in despair and frustration from the impact of a job you hate on your mental health when you can strive for happiness and success.

Building the courage to quit your job

Think about this - is it worth jeopardizing your mental health? 

Isn’t it better to look after your mental health rather than endure daily misery?

Don’t let fear of change paralyze you. Make the change you need. Use your current job as a stepping-stone towards your dream job or your business venture.

Leap now. You deserve a fulfilling job that brings you joy and helps you grow. 

There’s no point lingering in despair and frustration from the impact of a job you hate on your mental health when you can strive for happiness and success.

man at deskThis is Sam. He'd had enough of working in a job he hated. He quit his and started a small accounting firm. There were challenges, but Sam could breathe again. He was happier. He regained the relationships with family and friends. Best decision he ever made.

Take Sam, a 35-year-old accountant, deeply dissatisfied with his job. He was always angry, frustrated, and full of dread for the coming workday. Then, one day, Sam had had enough. He decided to quit his well-paying job and started his small accounting firm. There were challenges, of course, but Sam could breathe again. He was happier, more content, and his relationships with friends and family improved dramatically. Most importantly, he was finally looking after his mental health, living rather than merely surviving. Isn’t it time you did the same?

Summary


Identify the impact of a job you hate on your mental health.

What is making you unhappy?

Write it all in your notebook.

Evaluate the issues.

Score them.

Act on the highest issues. 

Make a plan of action.

Take stock of your health, especially your mental health. Seek professional advice.

Don’t accept misery. 

Change.

Create a morning schedule.

Consider engaging a mentor/life coach/guide/teacher.

You can do it. 

Don’t give up. 

Go you good thing.

Experience isn't the best teacher, experience is the only teacher.

cliff climber

Confidence comes from experience